Female
Asian
Studying in the UK ~


Message me to talk ;)

 

topiarynymph:

My uncle ties his dreads around my cousin to keep her from falling off his shoulders and I think it’s the greatest thing I’ve ever seen.

topiarynymph:

My uncle ties his dreads around my cousin to keep her from falling off his shoulders and I think it’s the greatest thing I’ve ever seen.

(Source: goblinnkingg)

strangedayshavefoundme666:

brokenasphyxiation:

zetatauri:

ohnonotthedrill:

ndnickerson:

COLLEGE FIRST.

I love how the Addams Family has ZERO slut-shaming. Like… honey you can dance naked and enslave someone with your womanly charms if you want to, I don’t fucking care, but so help me you’re going to get a college education first.

A+ PARENTING

The Addamses are what every family should aspire to be like (you know; without the dismemberment and electric chairs as play time).  Honestly, have you ever seen more unconditionally loving and supportive parents than Gomez and Morticia?  And not just with the kids, but with each other.  I think what’s especially unique about them is how open they are with everything.  They don’t treat their children like children.  They treat them like they treat everyone else; direct, and to the point. 

It’s creepy how many good examples of parenting and romantic relationships there is in these characters, especially considering they are supposed to be the antithesis of the stereotypical American nuclear family.

(Source: birlybir)

Anonymous asked
Why do gay guys use so much lube during sex? Whats it like without it?

knowmyintimatedetails:

ohfuckyaoi:

tmirai:

ackanime:

sherlockedinthetardiswithcrowley:

ikeaner-notp:

ohfuckyaoi:

THIS NEEDS WAY MORE NOTES

DEAR STRAIGHT BOYS THIS IS FOR YOU TOO MOTHERFUCKERS

I have to reblog this…no I MUST reblog this.

Lube is love, y’all.

I cant believe this is still going.

It’s still going because the amount of truth in that one gif is unparalleled.

jhameia:

driftingfocus:

anogoodrabblerouser:

disquietingtruths:

universalequalityisinevitable:

Robert Sapolsky about his study of the Keekorok baboon troop from National Geographic’s Stress: Portrait of a Killer.

Thiiiiiiis, people, thiiiis!

1. Kill alpha male types
2. Achieve world peace

Got it.

I’ve actually read a lot of Sapolsky’s work.  He’s one of my favorite scientists in the neuro/socio world.

I just watched the documentary and there is so much more about the troop that isn’t in this photoset—not only does the troop have a culture of little aggression and greater cooperation, but any incoming jerk baboons learned within a few months that their shitty behaviour was in no way acceptable, that the troop only rewarded sociability, and they changed accordingly. 

If effin’ baboons can learn this there’s pretty much no reason to believe that our only option in dealing with assholes is to just ignore their behaviour and let it continue.

winterstar95:

psychedelic-noodles:

humpthe-moist-cavewall:

My heart can’t handle this I’m going to bed

THEY RESCUED THE KITTY AND HUGGED IT OH GOD

I will reblog this every time.

(Source: sizvideos)

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)